Using New Question to grade Pear Deck

For the past two weeks I wanted students to work in teams using their books, periodic tables, and computers for research to find information about metals and nonmetals. So, I created metals and nonmetals Pear Decks that didn’t have any drawing slides so that the kids could learn through teamwork and move quickly through the questions. I started by quickly selecting teams using Wheel Decide, then had them work through the two assignments in student-paced mode. Normally, I just move through the slides showing correct answers letting the students change the answers in real-time. To me, grading these formative assessments is an unnecessary additional step since it’s about the learning, and the grade is an external reward. But, this time, I added a “new question” to the end of the deck, where they could grade themselves; four being a perfect score. The new question function is disabled in student-paced mode, but shows up immediately after changing the deck back to presentation mode. I realized that since this new question type was a draw slide that I’d need to limit their time. Otherwise, they’d dally and draw all over the score they chose, so I used the minute timer. Of course, almost all had a perfect score of...

2019: 4th Quarter 6th Grade Physical Science Assignments

All of the Atoms Notes Intro to Atoms Pear Deck (Formative) Atoms & Elements Quiz (Summative) 1st page example part 1 1st page example part 2 2nd page example part 1 2nd page example part 2 Radioisotopes Homework (Pride) Atom Builders Project (Formative) Metals Pear Deck (Formative) NonMetals Pear Deck (Formative) Make a Compound Homework (Pride) Alien Periodic Table (Formative) Chemical Equation of a Reaction Homework (Formative) Compound Project (Formative) Making Compounds Handout Compound Project Example Acid Base Homework (Pride) Bonds Lab Calendar Assignment (Formative) Bonds Lab Bonds Lab data table p1 Bonds Lab data table p2 Bonds Lab data table p3 Bonds Lab data table p4 Bonds Lab conclusion p1 Bonds Lab conclusion p2 Bonds Lab conclusion p3 Bonds Lab conclusion p4 Bonds Lab example 2 p1 Bonds Lab example 2 p2 Bonds Lab example 2 p3 Bonds Lab example 2 p4 Bonds Lab example 3 p1 Bonds Lab example 3 p2 Bonds Lab example 3 p3 Balancing Equations Notes PHET’s Balancing Equations Game Balance 10 Chemical Equations (10 pts) (Formative) Chemical Equations p2 50 Eq. Balanced Final Practice Exam (Summative) page 1 page 2 page 3 page 4 page 5 page 6 2 Hot 2 Handle Lab (Formative) Hypothesis Example Data Table Example Notes Example Conclusion p1 Example Conclusion p2 Example Conclusion p3...

2019: 3rd Quarter 6th Grade Physical Science Assignments

Thermal Energy Notes 1-18 Thermometer MiniLab (Formative) Ex. 1 Ex. 2 Refrigerator Homework (Pride) Absolute Zero Movie Questions Salt in Melting Ice Homework (Pride) Lowering the Freezing Point of Water with Salt Effect of Salt on Freezing Water Thermal Energy Quiz (Summative) Example p1 Example p2 Example p3 Example p4 Hot Air Balloon Homework (Pride) Ice Cream Lab (Formative) Ice Cream Lab Graphs All Periods Ice Cream Lab example graph Ice Cream Lab example p1 Ice Cream Lab example p2 States of Matter Homework (Pride) State Changes and Energies Notes Gas Notes Gas Lab (Formative) Gas lab graph Gas lab data table Gas lab Conclusion p1 Gas lab Conclusion p2 Gas Lab Graph Gas Lab Conclusion p1 Gas Lab Conclusion p2 Gas Lab Conclusion p3 Gas Lab Conclusion p4 Pascal’s Principle Homework (Pride) Fluid Dynamics Notes Pressure & Fluid Dynamics Quiz (Summative) Example page 1 Example page 2 Example page 3 Example page 4 Atomic Theory Video Pear Deck on Atoms (Formative) Favorite Element Homework (Pride) Make Your Own Periodic Table Homework (Pride) History of Elements Video History of Elements Pear Deck (Formative) Order of the Elements Video Order of the Elements Pear Deck (Formative) All of the Atoms...

2018: 2nd Quarter 6th Grade Physical Science Assignments

Acceleration Notes Acceleration Section Review Pear Deck (Formative) Acceleration Lab (Formative) Acceleration 1 p1 Acceleration 1 p2 Acceleration 2 p1 Acceleration 2 p2 Science Project Homework 4 (Pride) Science Project (Formative) Moon’s Gravity Homework (Pride) Free Fall MiniLab (Formative) Write-up ex1 Write-up ex2 Force and Motion Notes New Force and Work Notes Newton’s 3 Laws Video Rube Goldberg Homework (Pride) Quiz 3 Acceleration (Summative) example p1 example p2 Work Homework (Pride) pgs 352 #3,4 & 359 #4,5 (Formative) Can You Feel the Power Lab (Formative) Power Lab Example Front Page Power Lab Example data table1 Power Lab Example data table2 Power Lab Conclusion Conclusion New 2017 p1 Conclusion New 2017 p2 Power Homework (Pride) Simple Machines Homework (Pride) Energy Notes 1st Semester Final (Summative) 1st Semester Final ex. p1 1st Semester Final ex. p2 1st Semester Final ex. p3 1st Semester Final ex. p4 1st Semester Final ex. p5 1st Semester Final ex. p6 1st Semester Final ex. p7 1st Semester Final ex....

Computer Discipline

I’ve seen a vast wide range in norming student computer etiquette in classrooms. From being laissez-faire and figuring, “well the school of hard knocks will eventually teach ’em if they are fooling around on their computers”, and looking the other way as students hack away getting themselves further down a rabbit hole of negative consequences. To the opposite point of view of wearing that commando uniform and not allowing students to open their Chromebooks or log-in until the word “go”. Having volunteers that organize the Chromebook cart and plug them in each day. And Holding a hard line of “No Fidgeting on the computer.” “If you must fidget, do it on the desk, notebook, or something else, but not the computer.” The latter is the style I’ve embraced this year. When the kids come into class, the computer numbers, along with student names to which they are assigned, are projected onto the front screen along with the day’s Pear Deck log-in code. So, students must use a particular computer each time. This way, we can track down any problems to a particular student. I usually have started my 6 different Sessions (for 6 academic classes) before the students arrive. That way I don’t have to open any new sessions throughout the day, only close and save them with the name of the class period. The computers are all over the desks, and the kids immediately begin rearranging the room placing Chromebooks on the tables of other students they know, but haven’t yet arrived. So I praise and reward them for helping out their neighbors. As a result, there’s less...